Philosophy

Quand le Lion Saigne, les Chacals Reprennent Courage

wall-street

“When the lion bleeds, the jackals take back courage.” –Author Unknown

Fifty People, One Question: Brooklyn

“Take 5 minutes out of your day and WATCH THIS BEAUTIFUL VIDEO! really.


Fifty People, One Question: Brooklyn from Crush + Lovely on Vimeo.

Art Basel Miami: Let the Games Begin!

Cover

Kim Joon, Bird Land-Armani (detail), 2008

Just got this great summary from Artkrush who will be on the scene again this year bringing you all the goodness to be found. Be sure to keep checking back as the month develops…

"?Talk
of bursting bubbles and crashing markets has bled through the front
page and into the art sections of today's news. And so, as crates of
canvas arrive in Miami postmarked from around the world, the most
coveted position available in today's art world is that of the
spectator."

(more…)

Pecha Kucha Night at CoCA, Seattle. Thursday 7pm

Just found out about this one and won’t be able to make it because I’ll be in San Jose covering West Coast Green. But you all should go! These are great…

Please join CoCA as we play host to Pecha Kucha Night. This month’s theme is "Trouble". You’ve got some, we got some – let’s share. We’ve
assembled an incredible roster of writers, visual artists, race car
drivers, actors and other creative luminaries. Share ideas, see great
work – we’d love to see you there!

(more…)

Wabi Sabi, Biogerontology and “The Book of Tea”

by Daniel Flahiff

“It is essentially a worship of the Imperfect, as it is
a tender attempt to accomplish something possible in this impossible
thing we know as life.”

- Kakuzo Okakura
The Book of Tea

via Whisky River

carriage house

In art school we called it Wabi Sabi, in reference to objects that are imperfect, decaying or in various states of entropy. Picture an old barn, a rusty shovel, or even a rock worn smooth by rushing water, but be sure to leave out the romanticism. Wabi Sabi embraces and celebrates decay, acknowledging it as an essential part of life. The movement of all matter in the universe from order to chaos, from organization to disorganization.

(more…)

Theo Jansen’s Kinetic Sculpture is Alive! [almost]

Strandbeest8
These sculptural ‘animals’ are amazing; like a combination of DaVinci and David Cronenberg. Jansen has hit upon a form that resonates with my sense of the future/past as present; fairy tales, dinosaurs and mythical beasts.

They also make me think of the effects of space and time in the way Thomas Mann used space and time. Mann suggested [in The Magic Mountain] that movement through space has similar effects upon a person as those of the passage of time; distanciation, obfuscation and disorientation. Not ‘time-traveling’ but ‘travel-timing’; faster if not as permanent.

Anyway, check out the video too…

From Inhabitat:

“Theo Jansen has been creating wind-walking examples of artificial life since 1990. What was at first a rudimentary breed has slowly evolved into a generation of machines that are able to react to their environment: “over time, these skeletons have become increasingly better at surviving the elements such as storms and water and eventually I want to put these animals out in herds on the beaches, so they will live their own lives.”

Constructed as intricate assemblages of piping, wood, and wing-like sails, Jansen’s creatures are constantly evolving and have become excellently adapted to their sandy beach environment. The creatures sport legs, which “prove to be more efficient on sand than wheels . . . they don’t need to touch every inch of the ground along the way, as a wheel has to”. .”

read the rest after the jump…

Tom Kundig’s Delta Shelter…Again

Deltashelter
Tom Kundig has always been one of my favorite local architects. What’s not to love; a melange of rural sensibilities, modern aspirations and postmodern mash-ups. And while I’ve never really understood the argument placing his practice within the Modern movement, C. Mudede makes an interesting case for it in this brief article from The Stranger. Hopefully we will get a fully fleshed-out argument in the future…

From The Stranger:

    "The other modernism, the sort Kundig represents, retains the minimalism of zero-degree architecture, but it does not banish the processes of aging and physical change. In Kundig’s work, materials are not only exposed to time but time itself becomes a material. It is for this reason that his homes already have in them the majesty of their movement through time. "Buildings outlive people, you have to design with this in mind," Kundig points out. Buildings, like people, are not permanent; they have life spans, they are born, grow old, decline, and crumble."

To my thinking, Mudede doesn’t make a convincing case, but I’m up for more. [Kundig's aesthetic is far from 'zero-degree' IMO] Regardless, it’s always great to see Kundig’s work getting the attention it deserves. He’s a Northwest treasure.

Read the rest after the jump…

“Love of bustle is not industry”

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca, or Seneca the Younger) (c. 4 BC65 AD)

Tom Kundig’s ‘Delta Shelter’

Deltashelter
Tom Kundig has always been one of my favorite local architects. I mean, what’s not to love; a melange of rural sensibilities, Modern aspirations and Postmodern mash-ups. And while I’ve never really understood the argument placing his practice within the Modern movement, C. Mudede makes an interesting case for it in this brief article from The Stranger. Hopefully we will get a fully fleshed-out argument in the future…

From The Stranger:

"The other modernism, the sort Kundig represents, retains the
minimalism of zero-degree architecture, but it does not banish the
processes of aging and physical change. In Kundig’s work, materials are
not only exposed to time but time itself becomes a material. It is for
this reason that his homes already have in them the majesty of their
movement through time. "Buildings outlive people, you have to design
with this in mind," Kundig points out. Buildings, like people, are
not permanent; they have life spans, they are born, grow old, decline,
and crumble."

To my thinking, Mudede doesn’t make a convincing case, but I’m up for more. Regardless, it’s always great to see Kundig’s work getting the attention it deserves. He’s a Northwest treasure.

Read the rest after the jump…

“A goal without a plan is just a wish”

 
–Antoine de Saint-Exupery French writer (1900 – 1944)

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